turbid

turbid
turbid, muddy, roily are comparable when they mean not clear or translucent but clouded with or as if with sediment.
Turbid describes something (as a liquid or, in extended use, an idea, affair, or feeling) which is stirred up and disturbed so that it is made opaque or becomes obscured or confused
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the turbid water of a river in flood

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careless handling of a bottle makes wine turbid

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the turbid ebb and flow of human misery— Arnold

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the air without had the turbid yellow light of sandstorms— Cather

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turbid feelings, arising from ideas not fully mastered, had to clarify . . . themselves— H. O. Taylor

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Muddy describes something which is turbid or opaque as a result of being mixed with mud or with something suggestive of mud or which is merely mud-colored
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muddy coffee

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a muddy pond

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In extended use the term carries a stronger suggestion than turbid of a dull, heavy, or muddled character
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a muddy complexion

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a muddy thinker, but a superb artist— J. D. Adams

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the muddy and slow-moving plot has something to do with spying and counterspying— H. H. Holmes

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Roily describes something which is turbid and agitated
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where the roily Monongahela meets the clear Allegheny— Weed

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the human rubble . . . washed up by the roily wake of the war— Woodburn

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Analogous words: obscure, *dark, murky: *dirty, foul, nasty
Antonyms: clear: limpid

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Turbid — Tur bid, a. [L. turbidus, from turba tumult, disturbance, akin to turbare to disturb. See {Trouble}, and cf. {Disturb}, {Perturb}.] 1. Having the lees or sediment disturbed; roiled; muddy; thick; not clear; used of liquids of any kind; as, turbid …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • turbid — turbíd adj. m., pl. turbízi; f. sg. turbídă, pl. turbíde Trimis de siveco, 10.08.2004. Sursa: Dicţionar ortografic  TURBÍD, Ă adj. tulbure. (< fr. turbide) …   Dicționar Român

  • turbid — turbid, turgid The two words are unrelated but both can describe the flowing of water in their literal meanings (turbid means ‘opaque and cloudy’ and turgid means ‘swollen and overflowing’), and both refer to styles of writing in their figurative …   Modern English usage

  • turbid — index inextricable, opaque, unclear Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • turbid — (adj.) 1620s, from L. turbidus muddy, full of confusion, from turbare to confuse, bewilder, from turba turmoil, crowd, probably from Gk. tyrbe turmoil …   Etymology dictionary

  • turbid — ► ADJECTIVE 1) (of a liquid) cloudy, opaque, or thick with suspended matter. 2) obscure or confused in meaning or thought. DERIVATIVES turbidity noun. ORIGIN Latin turbidus, from turba a crowd, a disturbance …   English terms dictionary

  • turbid — [tʉr′bid] adj. [L turbidus < turba, a crowd < IE * turb < base * twer , to stir up > OE thwirel, stirring rod, churn handle] 1. muddy or cloudy from having the sediment stirred up 2. thick, dense, or dark, as clouds or smoke 3.… …   English World dictionary

  • turbid — adjective Etymology: Latin turbidus confused, turbid, from turba confusion, crowd, probably from Greek tyrbē confusion Date: 1626 1. a. thick or opaque with or as if with roiled sediment < a turbid stream > b. heavy with smoke or mist 2. a.… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • turbid — adjective Having the lees or sediment disturbed; roiled; muddy; thick; not clear; used of liquids of any kind turbid water; turbid wine Syn: c …   Wiktionary

  • turbid — adjective formal turbid water or liquid is dirty and muddy: the silty, turbid waters of the Congo river turbidity noun (U) …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

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